Tag Archives: black & white

The Boxing Cats (Prof. Welton’s) (1894)

Watch on Library of Congress

Institution: Library of Congress
Collection: Inventing Entertainment: The Early Motion Pictures and Sound Recordings of the Edison Companies

Other title: Boxing cats
Running time: 00m 22s
Source film: 35mm; b&w; silent
Year: 1894
Director: William K.L. Dickson
Cast: Henry Welton
Production: Thomas A. Edison; Edison Manufacturing Co., Black Maria Studio
Photography/Camera: William Heise


As far as inventor loyalties go, I’ve always considered myself part of Team Tesla rather than Camp Alva Edison, but one can’t argue the progress made at Edison’s Black Maria Studio in the early days of the moving image. (Ignore the fact that the earliest motion picture camera was likely engineered not by Edison, but by his employee, William K.L. Dickson; while you’re at it, strike Eadweard Muybridge from your memory too). In just a year’s time after the studio’s construction in West Orange, New Jersey, Edison and his cohorts were pumping out films of dancers, sneezes, and even cockfights, all of which clocked in at well under 60 seconds. Among these early films was 1894’s The Boxing Cats (Prof. Welton’s) — known more simply as Boxing Cats — which modern media outlets have come to recognize as “The Film Demonstrating That Our Freakish Obsession with Cat Videos Transcends Time and Space.”

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Would You Vote For a Woman for President? (1964)

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Institution: Northeast Historic Film
Collection: WCSH Collection
Identifier: 1619.0024
Item Record @ oldfilm.org

Running Time: 0m 54s
Source film: 16mm; b&w; sound
Year: 1964
Reporter: Lew Colby


On a rainy, January 1964 day in Portland, Maine, WCSH-TV reporter Lew Colby hit the streets with a camera crew and a microphone to address the pressing question of the day. After Maine’s own Republican Senator, Margaret Chase Smith, had voiced an interest in running for the presidency that year, the voting population was confronted with a startling potential choice: vote for a man … or vote for a woman!

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